Tough Immigration Laws- In Mexico

MEXICO VS. UNITED STATES: MEXICAN IMMIGRATION LAWS ARE TOUGHER

Posted by FactReal on May 8, 2010

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – Original Post – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –
Mexico has stricter immigration laws than the United States of America.
Here is a summary of two excellent 2006 research papers exposing how Mexico discriminates illegal and legal immigrants.
MEXICO’S IMMIGRATION LAW:[1][3]
(a.k.a. General Law on Population)
Mexico’s Immigration Law
(General Law on Population)

1999

Mexico welcomes only foreigners who will be useful to Mexican society:
– Foreigners are admitted into Mexico “according to their possibilities of contributing to national progress.” (Article 32)
– Immigration officials must “ensure” that “immigrants will be useful elements for the country and that they have the necessary funds for their sustenance” and for their dependents. (Article 34)
– Foreigners may be barred from the country if their presence upsets “the equilibrium of the national demographics,” when foreigners are deemed detrimental to “economic or national interests,” when they do not behave like good citizens in their own country, when they have broken Mexican laws, and when “they are not found to be physically or mentally healthy.” (Article 37)
– The Secretary of Governance may “suspend or prohibit the admission of foreigners when he determines it to be in the national interest.” (Article 38)• Mexican authorities must keep track of every single person in the country:
– Federal, local and municipal police must cooperate with federal immigration authorities upon request, i.e., to assist in the arrests of illegal immigrants. (Article 73)
– A National Population Registry keeps track of “every single individual who comprises the population of the country,” and verifies each individual’s identity. (Articles 85 and 86)
– A national Catalog of Foreigners tracks foreign tourists and immigrants (Article 87), and assigns each individual with a unique tracking number (Article 91).

Foreigners with fake papers, or who enter the country under false pretenses, may be imprisoned:
– Foreigners with fake immigration papers may be fined or imprisoned. (Article 116)
– Foreigners who sign government documents “with a signature that is false or different from that which he normally uses” are subject to fine and imprisonment. (Article 116)

Foreigners who fail to obey the rules will be fined, deported, and/or imprisoned as felons:
– Foreigners who fail to obey a deportation order are to be punished. (Article 117)
– Foreigners who are deported from Mexico and attempt to re-enter the country without authorization can be imprisoned for up to 10 years. (Article 118)
– Foreigners who violate the terms of their visa may be sentenced to up to six years in prison (Articles 119, 120 and 121). Foreigners who misrepresent the terms of their visa while in Mexico — such as working with out a permit — can also be imprisoned.

Under Mexican law, illegal immigration is a felony. The General Law on Population says,
– “A penalty of up to two years in prison and a fine of three hundred to five thousand pesos will be imposed on the foreigner who enters the country illegally.” (Article 123)
– Foreigners with legal immigration problems may be deported from Mexico instead of being imprisoned. (Article 125)
– Foreigners who “attempt against national sovereignty or security” will be deported. (Article 126)

Mexicans who help illegal aliens enter the country are themselves considered criminals under the law:
– A Mexican who marries a foreigner with the sole objective of helping the foreigner live in the country is subject to up to five years in prison. (Article 127)
– Shipping and airline companies that bring undocumented foreigners into Mexico will be fined. (Article 132)

MEXICO’S CONSTITUTION:[2][4]

The Mexican constitution expressly forbids non-citizens to participate in the country’s political life.
Non-citizens are forbidden to participate in demonstrations or express opinions in public about domestic politics. Article 9 states, “only citizens of the Republic may do so to take part in the political affairs of the country.” Article 33 is unambiguous: “Foreigners may not in any way participate in the political affairs of the country.”

The Mexican constitution denies fundamental property rights to foreigners.
If foreigners wish to have certain property rights, they must renounce the protection of their own governments or risk confiscation. Foreigners are forbidden to own land in Mexico within 100 kilometers of land borders or within 50 kilometers of the coast.

Article 27 states, “Only Mexicans by birth or naturalization and Mexican companies have the right to acquire ownership of lands, waters, and their appurtenances, or to obtain concessions for the exploitation of mines or of waters. The State may grant the same right to foreigners, provided they agree before the Ministry of Foreign Relations to consider themselves as nationals in respect to such property, and bind themselves not to invoke the protection of their governments in matters relating thereto; under penalty, in case of noncompliance with this agreement, of forfeiture of the property acquired to the Nation. Under no circumstances may foreigners acquire direct ownership of lands or waters within a zone of one hundred kilometers along the frontiers and of fifty kilometers along the shores of the country.” (Emphasis added)
The Mexican constitution denies equal employment rights to immigrants, even legal
ones, in the public sector.
“Mexicans shall have priority over foreigners under equality of circumstances for all classes of concessions and for all employment, positions, or commissions of the Government in which the status of citizenship is not indispensable. In time of peace no foreigner can serve in the Army nor in the police or public security forces.” (Article 32)

The Mexican constitution guarantees that immigrants will never be treated as real Mexican citizens, even if they are legally naturalized.
Article 32 bans foreigners, immigrants, and even naturalized citizens of Mexico from serving as military officers, Mexican-flagged ship and airline crew, and chiefs of seaports and airports:

“In order to belong to the National Navy or the Air Force, and to discharge any office or commission, it is required to be a Mexican by birth. This same status is indispensable for captains, pilots, masters, engineers, mechanics, and in general, for all personnel of the crew of any vessel or airship protected by the Mexican merchant flag or insignia. It is also necessary to be Mexican by birth to discharge the position of captain of the port and all services of practique and airport commandant, as well as all functions of customs agent in the Republic.”

An immigrant who becomes a naturalized Mexican citizen can be stripped of his Mexican citizenship if he lives again in the country of his origin for more than five years, under Article 37. Mexican-born citizens risk no such loss.

Foreign-born, naturalized Mexican citizens may not become federal lawmakers (Article 55), cabinet secretaries (Article 91) or supreme court justices (Article 95).

The president of Mexico must be a Mexican citizen by birth AND his parents must also be Mexican-born citizens (Article 82), thus giving secondary status to Mexican-born citizens born of immigrants.

The Mexican constitution singles out “undesirable aliens.” Article 11 guarantees federal protection against “undesirable aliens resident in the country.”

The Mexican constitution provides the right of private individuals to make citizen’s arrests.
Article 16 states, “in cases of flagrante delicto, any person may arrest the offender and his accomplices, turning them over without delay to the nearest authorities.” Therefore, the Mexican constitution appears to grant Mexican citizens the right to arrest illegal aliens and hand them over to police for prosecution.

The Mexican constitution states that foreigners may be expelled for any reason and without due process.
According to Article 33, “the Federal Executive shall have the exclusive power to compel any foreigner whose remaining he may deem inexpedient to abandon the national territory immediately and without the necessity of previous legal action.”

SOURCES
1. ^ Mexico’s General Law on Population (Ley General de Poblacion) accessed in 2006.
Website: Mexican Congress
2. ^ Mexico’s Constitution accessed in 2008. [English translation] UPDATE: [English translation]
Website: Mexico’s Chamber of Deputies (lower house of Congress) under
Leyes Federales y Estatales (Federal and State Laws).
3. ^ J. Michael Waller, Mexico’s Immigration Law: Let’s Try It Here at Home
4. ^ J. Michael Waller, Mexico’s Glass House: How the Mexican constitution treats foreign residents, workers and naturalized citizens
5.Mexico’s Law of General Population [current version]
6.Mexico’s Constitution of 1917 (Published) [current version]

10 Common Sense Steps to Immigration Reform- Trump Style

Inline image 1

 

 

TRUMP’S IMMIGRATION POLICY….1-10



#1 BUILD THE WALL!

#2 END “Catch and Release”

#3 ZERO Tolerance for illegal aliens

#4 ELIMINATE “sanctuary cities”

#5 REVERSE Barack Obama’s illegal “executive amnesty”

#6 SUSPEND visa issuance to risky countries

#7 ENSURE foreign countries accept their deported citizens

#8 COMPLETE bio-metric entry-exit visa program

#9 ENFORCE E-Verify with employers

#10 REFORM immigration to suit the best needs of the AMERICAN people

 

 

 

Trump: Details on Immigration

Donald Trump Has Outlined A Detailed And Bold Plan To Stop Illegal Immigration! 

On the border wall:

“On day one, we will begin working on an impenetrable physical wall on the southern border,” Trump said. “We will use the best technology, including above-and below-ground sensors, towers, aerial surveillance and manpower to supplement the wall, find and dislocate tunnels, and keep out the criminal cartels, and Mexico will pay for the wall.”

On “catch and release”:

“Under my Administration, anyone who illegally crosses the border will be detained until they are removed out of our country,” Trump said.

On his “zero tolerance policy”:

“According to federal data, there are at least 2 million criminal aliens now inside the country. We will begin moving them out day one, in joint operations with local, state and federal law enforcement. Beyond the 2 million, there are a vast number of additional criminal illegal immigrants who have fled or evaded justice. But their days on the run will soon be over. They go out, and they go out fast. Moving forward, we will issue detainers for all illegal immigrants who are arrested for any crime whatsoever, and they will be placed into immediate removal proceedings. We will terminate the Obama Administration’s deadly non-enforcement policies that allow thousands of criminal aliens to freely roam our streets.”

On enforcement:

“We are going to triple the number of ICE deportation officers. Within ICE, I am going to create a new special Deportation Task Force, focused on identifying and removing quickly the most dangerous criminal illegal immigrants in America who have evaded justice. The local police know who every one of these criminals are. There’s no great mystery to it, they’ve put up with it for years. And now, finally, we will turn the tables and law enforcement will be allowed to clear up this dangerous and threatening mess.”

On amnesty:

“We will immediately terminate President Obama’s two illegal executive amnesties, in which he defied federal law and the constitution to give amnesty to approximately 5 million illegal immigrants. Hillary Clinton has pledged to keep both of these illegal amnesty programs – including the 2014 amnesty which has been blocked by the Supreme Court. Clinton has also pledged to add a third executive amnesty. Clinton’s plan would trigger a Constitutional Crisis unlike almost anything we have ever seen before. In effect, she would be abolishing the lawmaking powers of Congress in order to write her own laws from the Oval Office. In a Trump Administration, all immigration laws will be enforced. As with any law enforcement activity, we will set priorities. But, unlike this Administration, no one will be immune or exempt from enforcement – and ICE and Border Patrol officers will be allowed to do their jobs. Anyone who has entered the United States illegally is subject to deportation – that is what it means to have laws and to have a country. Our enforcement priorities will include removing criminals, gang members, security threats, visa overstays, public charges – that is, those relying on public welfare or straining the safety net, along with millions of recent illegal arrivals and overstays who’ve come here under the current Administration.”

On visas:

“According to data provided to the Senate Subcommittee on Immigration and the National Interest, between 9/11 and the end of 2014, at least 380 foreign-born individuals were convicted in terror cases inside the United States. The number is likely higher, but the Administration refuses to provide this information to Congress. As soon as I enter office, I am going to ask the Department of State, Homeland Security and the Department of Justice to begin a comprehensive review of these cases in order to develop a list of regions and countries from which immigration must be suspended until proven and effective vetting mechanisms can be put into place. Countries from which immigration will be suspended would include places like Syria and Libya. For the price of resettling 1 refugee in the United States, 12 could be resettled in a safe zone in their home region. Another reform involves new screening tests for all applicants that include an ideological certification to make sure that those we are admitting to our country share our values and love our people. For instance, in the last five years, we’ve admitted nearly 100,000 immigrants from Iraq and Afghanistan – in these two countries, according to Pew research, a majority of residents say that the barbaric practice of honor killings against women are often or sometimes justified. Applicants will be asked for their views about honor killings, about respect for women and gays and minorities, attitudes on Radical Islam, and many other topics as part of the vetting procedure.”

 

Highlights of Donald Trump’s Immigration Speech and Mexico Trip

Photo

Donald J. Trump at his campaign event in Phoenix on Wednesday. Credit Travis Dove for The New York Times

Donald J. Trump met in Mexico on Wednesday with President Enrique Peña Nieto, who is being criticized by many Mexicans for holding the meeting. In a subdued joint appearance before the press in Mexico City, the two men described the meeting as warm, despite significant disagreements on issues of trade and immigration.

Then in Phoenix, Mr. Trump delivered his immigration policies in a speech. Here are the highlights of that speech, which was startlingly at odds with what he articulated in Mexico (and how Mr. Trump’s views on immigration have changed over time):

• Mr. Trump explained his supporters to those voters who are wary of them and their perceived anti-immigrant views, in a sense speaking directly to those who fear him as much as the the audience right in front of him. “These are valid concerns expressed by decent and patriotic citizens,” he said.

• Trump ticked through the names of three Americans who were killed by undocumented immigrants. These are staples of his speeches and familiar to his audiences at this stage of the campaign. He has held them up as examples of an immigration system run amok with tragic consequences.

• Trump made the case that elites in Washington and in the media have put the wrong focus on the immigration debate – by emphasizing the plight of an estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants in the country, not the Americans impacted by their presence. “Anyone who tells you that the core issues is the needs of those living here illegally has simply spent too much time in Washington. Only the out of touch media elites think the biggest problems facing American society today is that there are 11 illegal immigrants who don’t have legal status.”

Here’s Trump’s plan for combating illegal immigration, boiled down to its simplest elements:

1. Build the wall

2. End catch and release policy for undocumented immigrants and instead return them to their country of origin

3. Have zero tolerance for undocumented immigrants who have committed a crime. He will deport them.

4. Triple number of deportation officers at the department of Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

5. Repeal President Obama’s executive orders that temporarily protected undocumented immigrants from deportation and authorized them to receive work permit

6. Stop issuing visas to any country where “adequate screening cannot occur” that might endanger national security;.

7. Ensure foreign countries take back deported immigrants from the United States: Mr. Trump said 23 countries refuse to do so

8. Complete a biometric entry and exit visa tracking system under development. “It will be on land, it will be on sea, it will be in the air,” he said.

• Comparing himself to Hillary Clinton, who he maligned throughout the speech, Mr. Trump asked: “What do you have to lose? Chose me.” It was an echo of a much mocked question he asked black voters recently.

• “Maybe they’ll be able to deport her.” Mr. Trump provocatively wondered whether its possible to send Mrs. Clinton out of the country.

• A memorable passage from this speech: “Our message to the world will be this: You cannot obtain legal status or become a citizen of the United States by illegally entering our country. Can’t do it. This declaration alone will stop the crisis of illegal crossing. You can’t just smuggle in, hunker down and wait to be legalized. Those days are over.”

• Mr. Trump invited onto the stage the mothers and fathers of Americans whose children were killed by undocumented immigrants. He asked each to describe their children and how they died. He then kissed many of them on the cheek. It was the most emotional moment of the speech. “If you don’t vote Trump, we won’t have a country,” one of the mother told the audience.

Donald Trump’s Immigration Speech: Analysis

Donald J. Trump delivered a speech in Phoenix on Wednesday that was expected to clarify his shifting stance on hard-line immigration policies, following a trip to Mexico to speak with President Enrique Peña Nieto.

_____

And here are the highlights from Mr. Trump’s trip to Mexico: He reached out to the Mexican president and people.

Mr. Trump, first reading slowly from a statement and then speaking more freely in response to a question, said he now considered Mr. Peña Nieto a friend and heaped praise on Americans of Mexican descent. Mexican-Americans, Mr. Trump said, were “beyond reproach” and “spectacular, hard-working people.”

But Mr. Trump said he also told Mr. Peña Nieto directly that he felt Mexico had benefited disproportionately from its trade agreements with the United States, and that he had described illegal immigration as a problem for both countries.

_____

He raised his plan to build a wall, but there’s a dispute over whether he and Mr. Peña Nieto discussed who would pay for it.

Mr. Trump said the two did not discuss the issue of forcing Mexico to pay for a border wall — one of the signature promises of his campaign. Mr. Peña Nieto did not challenge the idea during the news conference but later posted on Twitter that, during his meeting with Mr. Trump, he had made it clear that Mexico wouldn’t pay for the wall.

_____

Mr. Peña Nieto pressed Mr. Trump on his contentious comments and pushed back against his assertions on trade.

Mr. Peña Nieto pushed back in the gentlest of terms on several of Mr. Trump’s claims on Nafta, citing U.S. Chamber of Commerce statistics to argue that free trade had been beneficial for both countries and stressing the economic importance of easy movement across the border.

Without mentioning specific remarks by Mr. Trump, Mexico’s president said that hurtful comments had been made. “Mexican nationals in the United States are honest people, working people,” he said, adding, “Mexicans deserve everybody’s respect.”

But Mr. Peña Nieto stopped well short of scolding Mr. Trump on the international stage. On the contrary, he expressed optimism that they could work together if Mr. Trump was elected president, “even though we do not agree on everything.”

_____

Despite a call on social media for anti-Trump protesters, the turnout at one rally was underwhelming.

The showing was something of a surprise, considering the sense of betrayal among many Mexicans, who feel that their president sold them out to the worst possible person.

By the start time of 11 a.m., there were dozens of journalist but only a few protesters. A half-hour later, the number of protesters — at least those being vocal and carrying anti-Trump signs — seemed stuck at four, including a guy wearing a Mexican wrestling mask, while the number of journalists topped 50. By 12:30 p.m., there were no more than 10 demonstrators, while the journalist pack continued to balloon.

Still, the protesters did their best to represent the anger and disappointment that many Mexicans have expressed toward Mr. Trump as well as toward Mr. Peña Nieto, who is struggling with low approval ratings and a string of scandals. He has spoken out sharply against Mr. Trump in the past, saying in a television interview last month that there was “no way” Mexico would pay for a border wall, and earlier comparing Mr. Trump’s campaign to the rise of Hitler.

“The president didn’t represent the Mexican people, he didn’t consult with us,” said the demonstrator in the wrestling mask, who called himself “Maldito Perro” — Damned Dog — though later said his real name was Diego Garcia.

He admitted to being disappointed by the anemic turnout. Social media activity, he lamented, seemed to be replacing the time-honored tradition of the street protest.

“These days people protest by clicking ‘like’ or ‘dislike,’ ” he said.